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New exhibition challenges the barriers that people who are partially sighted face each day

New exhibition challenges the barriers that people who are partially sighted face each day

  • Date10 November 2022

Layers of Vision, the new exhibition opening at Bush House Arcade, London challenges the barriers that people who are blind or have sight loss are facing in everyday life. The exhibit includes leading research from Dr Anica Zeyen, from the School of Business and Management at Royal Holloway, and a member of the Centre for the Study of Pain and Wellbeing.

layers of vision.PNG (5)

Its FAB too touch: a hand is exploring a work of art made of large braille text that has been cut from painted wood. The braille is arranged in bands: a lower band of red on a bright blue background, and an upper band of white on a bright blue background.

The exhibit explores the experiences and perspectives of blind and partially sighted (BPS) artists and what they encounter living in a world made for sighted people. This was inspired and informed by ongoing research into understanding how museums in the UK make their art collections and installations accessible to BPS visitors. This includes the considerations necessary in the creation and the experience of events that ensure BPS visitors can access these experiences and participate independently.

Layers of Vision includes ten artworks that celebrate and creatively explore accessibility, with each piece appreciating different forms of vision. The exhibit features multisensory elements which question the common views and practices around access and disability inclusion within the arts and beyond.

Ten artists within the exhibit collaborated with academics from Royal Holloway, King’s Business School, and Lancaster University, alongside arts charity Shape Arts, King’s Culture, King’s Digital Lab and Praline, to stimulate discussion and debate about accessibility and the arts. The artists exhibiting include Aaron McPeake, Alice Christina-Corrigan, Bianca Raffaella, Clarke Reynolds, David Johnson, Fae Kilburn, Mickel aka Ebony Rose Dark, Natalie Doig, Sally Booth and Zoe Partington.

Layers of Vision has been developed on the principle of co-creation, with members of the BPS community guiding the direction and implementation of the show. The exhibiting artists all present work that explores their lived experience of visual impairment.

Dr Anica Zeyen from Royal Holloway said: “The research and the Layers of Vision exhibit above all explores the experiences and perspectives of blind and partially sighted (BPS) artists and what they encounter living in a world made for sighted people.

“I’m delighted that visitors will be able to experience and celebrate the creativity and research which went into each art piece to explore the different forms of vision and highlight the importance of using multisensory elements within museums to be accessible to all visitors.”

Layers of Vision is devised by Dr Anica Zeyen from Royal Holloway, Dr Katharina C. Husemann from King’s College London and Dr Leighanne Higgins from Lancaster University.

The exhibition will be available to visit from 21 November to 16 December 2022. For more information, including opening times and accessibility information, click here.

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